Tips for Kids

Preventing Abduction
  • Don't play in deserted areas - such as empty playgrounds, parks, construction sites or dumps.
  • Stay with your mom or dad in public places or use the buddy system. Play, walk, bike, and skate with a friend.
  • If you are out somewhere with an adult and you lose them, do not go looking for them. If you are in a store, go to the cashier or security guard and ask for help. If you cannot find a cashier or security guard and you are in trouble, look for a woman with small children for help.
  • Stay alert and trust your instincts. If something does not feel right, like you think someone is following you, you are probably right. Try to notice if an adult is hanging around your school playground, your park, or yard, and then go to where you know you can find other people.
  • If you think someone is following you, cross the street and go into a store. Tell a police officer or a mother with a child. Don't try to hide - go to where you know you can find other people.
  • If someone tries to grab you, kick, punch, and yell: "No! I don't know you! You aren't my Mom (or Dad)!"
  • If the person is in a car, stay as far away from the car as you can. Go into a store or turn around, and walk or run in the opposite direction the car is going.
  • Never, ever hitchhike or accept a ride from someone. Don't go near a stranger's car. Never get into a car with someone you don't know, for any reason. Sometimes people use tricks like saying your mom is hurt, or they lost their dog or kitten to try to get you to go with them. Do not go with them!
  • If someone does manage to get you in their car, do not put on your seatbelt. Jump out when you see people and the car has to make a stop.
General Safety Checklist
  • I know my full name, my parent's names, and our address and phone number.
  • I know when and how to use 911. I know I can dial 911 from a pay phone without any money.
  • I never put my name on my clothes, jewelry, caps, or belongings where people can see it.
  • I tell my parents about things that happen to me that make me feel scared, uncomfortable, or sad.
  • I know the difference between a good secret and a bad secret. A good secret is fun to keep, like a surprise party. A bad secret feels bad to keep, and telling my parents about it doesn’t make me a tattle tale.
  • Strangers: I know that a stranger is anyone I don’t know well. Even people I recognize - like the mail carrier or ice cream truck driver are strangers. I also know that someone can be a stranger even if they look nice or know my name. I never tell strangers my name or where I live.
  • Buddy System: I use the buddy system and avoid walking or playing alone outside and in public places.
  • Walking: When I walk down the street, I always face traffic so that I can see if someone stops their car near me. I never take short cuts through deserted areas like creeks or vacant lots.
  • Yell NO, Run and Tell: I know that yelling and running are better safety ideas than trying to hide. If a stranger approaches me, I will YELL No, RUN to where there are safe adults, and TELL an adult.
  • Safe Distance: I know to stay a safe distance (approximately three arm-lengths) away from strangers and stranger’s cars, even if a stranger seems nice. I know to run in the direction opposite from the direction the stranger’s car is traveling.
  • Fight Back: It is okay to yell and fight; anything to get the stranger to let go. Yelling is the most important thing I can do, and to yell, No! Help! or Fire! to get an adult’s attention.
  • Home Safety: I keep all the doors and windows locked when I am home alone, and to go to a neighbor and call 911 if a window is broken or if the door is open when I get home. I know how to call my parents or a neighbor if I get frightened when I’m home alone.
  • Doorbell Safety: I answer the door by asking, “Who is it?” I never say that I am alone, and never open the door when I am alone, unless it is someone my parents told me to expect and let in. When I am alone, I always talk through the door and say things like, “My parents are busy now, I’ll tell them you stopped by.” If the person does not leave, I know to call 911.
  • Phone Safety: I never say that I am alone when a stranger calls. I let the answering machine screen calls or say, Mom/Dad can’t come to the phone now, can I take a message? If someone is making strange noises, saying scary things, or not saying anything, I will hang up the phone.
  • Internet Safety: I know never to give my last name, address, or phone number to a person on the Internet, and that it is never safe to meet Internet friends in person without my parent’s supervision and consent.
Safety at Home
  • Many kids get home before their parents. If you come home before your mom or dad, make sure the first thing you do is call and let your mom or dad know you got home okay.
  • If you come home and a window in your house is broken or a door is open that shouldn't be, don't go in. Go to a trusted neighbor, or find a phone and call 911.
  • If you have to stay after school or want to play or study with a friend, tell your mom or dad.
  • Don't leave your home without asking your mom or dad first. Make sure a parent knows where you are going and for how long. Always tell your mom or dad where you will be and when you will be home.
  • When your family is home and the doorbell rings, always find out who it is and ask your mom or dad before you open the door.
  • If you are home alone, never open the door -- unless you can see that it is a relative or a specific person who your mom or dad said would come over to stay with you.
  • Never tell someone you are home alone, whether they call on the phone or come by your house. Ask your mom or dad what they would like you to say, like: "My Dad's in the shower, can he call you when he gets out?"
  • Never give information to anyone over the phone about yourself, your family or where you live. Hang up on anyone who calls to bother you or who says bad things on the phone.
  • Ask your mom or dad for permission to go outside of your play area or yard or to go into someone's home.
  • If you have a babysitter that hits you, touches you or makes you play games that embarrass you, tell a trusted adult, even if the babysitter told you not to.
  • Keep all the windows and doors in your home locked.
  • If someone tries to break into your home, call 911 immediately and give them your full address, including your apartment number if you have one. Tell them that you are at home and someone is trying to break in. Then, try calling a neighbor you know is usually home. If you can get out of the house, get out. If you can hide, hide.
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